Carbon dating metal

08 May

Q-carbon, which is created by rapidly cooling a sample of elemental carbon whose temperature has been raised to 4,000 K (3,727 °C [6,740 °F]), is harder than diamond, and it can be used to manufacture diamond structures (such as diamond films and microneedles) within its matrix. Each of the “amorphous” forms of carbon has its own specific character, and, hence, each has its own particular applications.

All are products of oxidation and other forms of decomposition of organic compounds.

Graphite, on the other hand, is a soft slippery solid that is a good conductor of both heat and electricity.

Carbon as diamond is the most expensive and brilliant of all the natural gemstones and the hardest of the naturally occurring abrasives. In microcrystalline and nearly amorphous form, it is used as a black pigment, as an adsorbent, as a fuel, as a filler for rubber, and, mixed with clay, as the “lead” of pencils.

Coal and coke, for example, are used extensively as fuels.

Charcoal is used as an absorptive and filtering agent and as a fuel and was once widely used as an ingredient in gunpowder.

It was later found to occur naturally in tiny amounts on Earth and in meteorites.

Other forms—such as coke—are sometimes called amorphous, but X-ray examination has revealed that these substances do possess a low degree of crystallinity.

Carbon is widely distributed as coal and in the organic compounds that constitute petroleum, natural gas, and all plant and animal tissue.

A natural sequence of chemical reactions called the carbon cycle—involving conversion of atmospheric carbon dioxide to carbohydrates by photosynthesis in plants, the consumption of these carbohydrates by animals and oxidation of them through metabolism to produce carbon dioxide and other products, and the return of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere—is one of the most important of all biological processes.

Carbon as an element was discovered by the first person to handle charcoal from fire.

Thus, together with sulfur, iron, tin, lead, copper, mercury, silver, and gold, carbon was one of the small group of elements well known in the ancient world.